National Museum Planetarium, Manila (Updated: May 2019)

7 things to expect at National Museum Planetarium in Manila, Philippines (UPDATED: May 2019)

National Museum Planetarium
Image from National Museum Planetarium Facebook Page

The National Museum Planetarium is one of many divisions of the National Museum of the Philippines. Located in Ermita, Manila, this division is one of my favorites among all museums I have visited in the Country. You’ll know why when we get to the next pages 🙂

There are other museum divisions near the Planetarium, namely: National Museum of Anthropology (open), National Museum of Natural History (open), and National Museum of Art (open).

There are many routes and roads to the Planetarium, but perhaps the most popular and easiest is by using the Light Rail Transit (LRT). Whether you’re from Monumento or Baclaran, just alight at United Nations Avenue Station and walk your way to the Museum. Below is a map you can use for directions.

It’s just 1km away from the nearest MRT station, and I suggest you wear sunglasses or use an umbrella when visiting from morning to mid afternoon. The heat in Manila during summer season at times becomes unbearable. And – don’t forget to drink lots of water before heading out!

Map

Of course I’ll show you the way: (For mobile users: open the photo, scroll up, and click “View full size” to view them in High Resolution)

Now that you’ve made your way through, let’s start with the first two things to expect at the National Planetarium:


Number 1

This is actually more like a Tip: Catch the shows before lunch so you’ll be able to get in fast, and have the Planetarium for yourself.

We went here on a Wednesday for the 10:30am screening of A Planet for Goldilocks, and we didn’t see a line, nor people wandering around the Planetarium. We were able to go in after signing the registration form.


Number 2

There are 2 Full-Dome Shows you can watch for a minimal fee:
  • Starting June 2018, there will only be two shows per month.
  • Children below 4 years of age are not allowed in the Planetarium.
Planetarium Fees
Image from National Museum Planetarium Facebook Page

Again, come early! If you can make it to the first two screenings, the better. You can find your preferred seat inside the Dome, and not worry about standing in line under the scorching hot sun in the afternoon shows.

Admission Fees Per Show:

₱50 – Adults
₱40 – Senior/PWD
₱30 – Students

Here are the shows/descriptions and their respective schedule for the month of January (The National Museum Planetarium Facebook Page have not uploaded or released any schedule for May yet, but most likely, it will follow the same schedule as January 2019. Please contact the National Museum Planetarium for more information)

So if you got nothing to do at home, or if just you feel the need to be exposed to astronomical knowledge, this is the perfect place.


Number 3

Phones and cameras of all sorts (Mirrorless, DSLR, Compact) are not allowed inside the Dome.

Don’t worry! you can still bring your precious gadgets, you just have to put them in your bag and have the Planetary Guards keep them safe. (get it? planetary guards? lol. corny)

Planetary Guards

They are friendly! Don’t forget to thank them when getting your precious bags after the show 🙂


Number 4

The Dome is fully Air conditioned. I know you’ve been wanting to know if it is. You’re welcome!

Yes, you can rejoice! you’ll actually feel like you’re in a movie theater with a huge machine in the middle. This is the 30 million peso state-of-the-art projection system that the museum management acquired from Japan. (I actually thought this was just a museum artifact, and was wowed when it moved haha)

Hybrid Projection System
Photo by Jonathan Cellona, ABS-CBN News

Notice the seats, they are very comfortable! they tilt (slightly) too!


Number 5

Prepare to be blown away!

I’m not even exaggerating. The whole experience was so great, it’s like watching a 3D movie without the need for glasses. Unfortunately, I am unable to share what it looks like inside since phones and cameras aren’t allowed. But trust me, you’ll be amazed. Just check the media photo I posted above to get a glimpse on what it looks like inside.


Each show has a run time of around 30-45 minutes.


Number 6

The Dome houses 200+ seats, so even if you wait in line for the afternoon shows, there’s still a big chance you’ll find a vacant seat. 

Of course given that the people in line are not over the maximum capacity, that you need to ask the guards on duty. There are several guards who monitor the people in line, and would tell you if you still have a chance to secure a seat. (pati ba naman dito chances lang? jk) 

(For mobile users: open the photo, scroll up, and click “View full size” to view them in High Resolution)


Number 7

Expect to go back with family and friends.

Of course you would want to share the great experience with your loved ones! make sure you bring your Family and/or inform your Friends so they too can watch the awesome shows at the National Museum Planetarium!


 Additional Information:


If you have any questions, clarifications, if you found details that are incorrect, or you just want to share something, please feel free to comment below and I will respond ASAP.

Map
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11 thoughts on “National Museum Planetarium, Manila (Updated: May 2019)

    1. Please do re-visit! The Planetarium is fully renovated inside with new comfortable seats and a better projector 🙂

      Hope you can share with me your experience when you go back. Thanks!

      Like

  1. Paolo Gabarda

    Perfect treat for myself on my birthday! I always dream to go there since I was a kid. Big thanks to your blog, I’m urged to file a vacation leave and go there on Friday, August 18! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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